Scorecard

The STEM Talent Pathway Scorecard will reflect how well we are collectively supporting local youth in San Francisco through their education to employment journey into STEM careers.

The collaborative will utilize LinkedIn and Beyond 12 to collect data on young people’s progress, for the first time shedding light on the critical time period in a youth’s life from the age of 18 to 24. This will allow all collaborative members to gain visibility into the long term outcomes of their investments and enable the ability to fine tune STEM programming to better support youth based on their identified needs.

The STEM Talent Pathway is a collective impact effort that includes partners across the education to employment pipeline. This scorecard includes measures to track progress in increasing participation of traditionally under-represented youth in STEM from high school through to employment. By looking at the data holistically, over time, we will be able to target loss points and develop solutions for increasing exposure and interest in STEM careers. Through our shared commitment to our local youth, we will work to increase the number of students who obtain high wage, high demand STEM jobs in the San Francisco area.

Why these measures?

  • Abundant evidence shows that active engagement enhances learning for students of all demographics and has especially beneficial effects on women and other underrepresented groups. In STEM disciplines, use of active learning not only improves learning outcomes, but also helps to retain students in STEM majors. (White House, 2016).
  • SFSUD graduates who wish to attend a UC/CSU school must receive a C or better in all their A-G requirements, this is therefore a good indicator of college readiness for those pursuing a post-secondary degree or credential.
  • Completing higher education has been associated with more employment opportunities, greater earning potential, and better overall health. Given the high cost of living in San Francisco and the correlation between high school graduation and higher earnings, it is imperative to track this measure. (Our Children, Our Families, Outcome Framework 2016).

Graduation Rates

2014 – 2015

2015 – 2016

SFUSD high school students

84.9%

86.5%

SFUSD high school students who complete A-G with a C or better

59.8%

54.6%

Graduation Rates

SFUSD high school students

2014 – 2015

84.9%

2015 – 2016

86.5%

SFUSD high school students who complete A-G with a C or better

2014 – 2015

59.8%

2015 – 2016

54.6%

Why these measures?

Research has linked the completion of post-secondary education with several positive life outcomes. Individuals who graduate with a post-secondary degree are more likely to secure jobs with higher wages and have continued benefits throughout their career, including the skills needed to be competitive in today’s job market. Additionally, by 2018, only 37% of available jobs are projected to require only a high school diploma. The remaining 63% of jobs will require a college degree. In addition to four-year degrees, certificates also have value. Research indicates that short-term certificates – such as those offered in community colleges – can lead to better employment odds and higher wages – sometimes even more so than bachelor’s degrees. (Our Children, Our Families, Outcome Framework, 2016).

 

City College of San Francisco

San Francisco State University

University of San Francisco

Number of students who complete a STEM degree

84.9%

84.9%

84.9%

Number of students who complete a STEM degree

City College of San Francisco

84.9%

San Francisco State University

84.9%

University of San Francisco

84.9%

Why these measures?

City youth-focused programs can help young people navigate their way through adolescence and young adulthood. They can offer experiences that help youth acquire the skills that will promote their success in high school, college, the labor market, and life. The city funds a number of programs to assist San Francisco’s young people in reaching their academic and workplace goals. OEWD and DCYF engage youth currently enrolled in secondary and post-secondary education as well as transitional aged youth, who are disconnected from the education system and labor market to achieve academic credentials, transition to post-secondary education, and/or secure living wage employment. There are five city funded-programs that focus specifically on STEM, with over 40 that focus on soft skills, college readiness, and job access.

Why these measures?

Research on work-based learning shows clear benefits for students, such as:

  • Students become more interested in STEM degrees, certificates, and careers.
  • Students connect what they are learning in the classroom to the education and skills required for success in today’s workplace.
  • Students become more motivated to do well in school and pursue postsecondary education.
  • Students gain an understanding of workplace norms, including the “soft skills” that can influence career success.
  • Students in career preparation programs (such as internships) gain valuable work experience that can launch their careers.
  • Students have opportunities to interact with and learn from an expanded circle of adults and potential mentors. (Change the Equation, 2015).

The STEM Talent Pathway is the first signature project of UniteSF, an initiative co-led by Mayor Edwin M. Lee, the Superintendent of Schools and President & CEO of the San Francisco Chamber of Commerce.

Unite SF Education logo